mistress of surgery
meghna (may+gnaa).
an infp indian
feminist med student who enjoys eating & drooling over fab clothes. aspiring neurosurgeon.
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blue-lights-and-tea:

medicalschool:

Head-Neck Angiography

Volume Rendering of a contrast enhanced CT angiography of the supraaortal vessels. Moderate stenosis at the origin of the right sided internal carotid artery.

Astounding images

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ragincontagion:

Colles’ fracture is a fracture of the distal radius bone above the radio-carpal joint without involvement of the ulnar bone resulting in a posterior and radial displacement of the hand. It’s usually the result of someone trying to break a fall on their outstretched arm and has a high prevalence among patients with osteoporosis.

I never want to love someone like that, so much that there would be no room left for myself, so much that I wouldn’t be able to survive if he left me.

—Girl in Translation (Jean Kwok)

intrauterine:

"Depression is such a cruel punishment. There are no fevers, no rashes, no blood tests to send people scurrying in concern. Just the slow erosion of the self, as insidious as any cancer. And, like cancer, it is essentially a solitary experience. A room in hell with only your name on the door."

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stunningpicture:

Chinese doctors bowing down to a 11 year old boy diagnosed with brain cancer who managed to save several lives by donating his organs to the hospital he was being treated in shortly before his death.

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corporisfabrica:

Annotated radiographs of the hands of an adult (above) and a child (below)

From childhood, the bones of the hand undergo major development. Note the changes in position and size among the bones of the wrist as well as the joining of the phalanges to their proximal epipheses (seen below as dark, narrow bands adjacent to each bone in the fingers of the five-year-old).

See if you can spot something unusual in one of the radiographs…

Illustration from Cunningham’s Manual of Practical Anatomy, 7th Edition (1920) 

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scienceyoucanlove:

Plastinated brain in an open skull - this specimen offers a look at the connection between the eye and brain via the optic nerve. 

Did you know that Kenhub has a library full of anatomy articles?
Check out this one: http://bit.ly/The-Skull

Image copyright: Gunther von Hagens, Institute for Plastination, Heidelberg, Germany

text source

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jewsee-medicalstudent:

A child is born.

Swedish photographer Lennart Nilsson spent 12 years of his life taking pictures of the foetus developing in the womb. These incredible photographs were taken with conventional cameras with macro lenses, an endoscope and scanning electron microscope. Nilsson used a magnification of hundreds of thousands and “worked” right in the womb.

He published is work as a book, A child is born, in 1965 and it consists of photographs charting the development of the human embryo and fetus from conception to birth. Photographs are accompanied by text, written by doctors, describing prenatal development and offering advice on antenatal care.

This picture shows a foetus of 16 weeks. The skeleton consists mainly of flexible cartridge and a network of blood vessels is visible through the thin skin.

  • Interviewer: Do you think that rock music could push people to take drugs?
  • David Bowie: I'll go the other way on that. If I had a fan of mine who got through university and became a doctor, would I also get the credit for that please?